The U.S. Innovation System

In a new ITIF report,"Where Do Innovations Come From? Transformations in the U.S. National Innovation System, 1970-2006", finds that the nature of the U.S. innovation system has changed dramatically over the course of the last 40 years. It suggest that to succeed in the future, U.S. innovation policy must help support and reinforce our natural national advantage in collaboration. Thus, funding for the U.S. government’s technology initiatives should be expanded and made more secure, and the coordination of these technology initiatives across the federal government, particularly those that support partnerships between firms, universities, and federal laboratories, must be improved.

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